The next Art Week Exeter takes place from 13–21 May 2017. More information (and a new website) will follow in March 2017.

The 60/60 Project ⌗8

Lucy Patrick

Exhibiting a sound and visual installation: Pools of Colour at The Glorious Art House

Lucy Patrick sketchbook Lucy Patrick studio

Where do you find inspiration?

In the ponds, pools and puddles of Exeter

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

Yes, my sketchbook is very important to me. I keep a daily record of ideas, influences and things seen and read. It allows me to be looser and playful with materials and charts progress and development of my artistic process.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

Pools of Colour is a show about memory….the city of Exeter’s memory of puddles it has seen and which disappear, the experience of drinking a cup of coffee in The Glorious Art House and the evocation of experiences that emerge in that small ritual.

Who are your influences?

Joseph Beuys, Pamela Lee, Cave people art and Carol Morley in the film “The Falling”.

What do you listen to when you’re working?

I work in a hand-made shoe factory (Greenshoes) and I listen to the workers hammering and laughing as they make their shoes. This noise seems to work it’s way into what I am doing.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

I have recently been researching the work of the “psycho-geographers” and in particular Phil Smith who wrote: “Mythogeography – The Art of Walking Sideways.

 

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?

My camera…I would take a picture of the fire and work that into the next piece I did.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

I hope that people will look at puddles in a new light from that moment on.

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art?

Yes. I put a rusty bedspring topped by a mouldy fairy cake into an exhibition at Greenhill Arts, Moretonhampstead and then bought it myself so that the little red dot could be displayed.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.

I’ve learnt to persist despite the huge painful doubts that beset me all the time.

What are you looking forward to this year?

I’ve given up work to focus on my artwork and I am very much looking forward to the new journey that this will take me on.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.

The puddle by the workshop in Tudor street (when it has been raining!).

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The 60/60 Project ⌗7

Tamara Savchenko

Open Studio at: The Studio, 1 Stoke Valley Road

Tamara 2 Tamara 1 Tamara 3

Where do you find inspiration?

Curiosity

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

Yes. I don’t do major works without sketching it first. Also I just doodle.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

The unexpected death of my husband.

Who are your influences?

Picasso, Malevich, El Greco, Hockney Pollock

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

Russian revolution art at the Royal Academy of Art

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

Looking at the world with my eyes

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?

Yes. “You should continue what you are doing”

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

Everything, including frustration

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The 60/60 Project ⌗6

Robert Davies SGFA

Exhibiting in the Customs House

Robert davies abstract 1Robert davies portrait

Where do you find inspiration?

I express feeling through landscapes, seascapes; the disposition of people and objects within the composition. With abstracts I show mood through colour and shape. I work from sketchbooks; I like being in ‘unregarded’ settings, like boatyards, scrap-yards; abandoned greenhouses, and so on.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

I keep sketchbooks of various sizes and use them according to need and occasion.

What do you listen to when you’re working?

Prokofiev, Bach, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Modern Jazz, organ music.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

Pastels and modelling in clay.

What’s your favourite tool?

Pen and pencil.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

Utagawa Hirosige – Landscape, Cityscape; from the Ashmolean Museum and on show at RAMM.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

A connexion with the nature of being.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.

To be open to different ways of approaching exhibiting.

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?

”The Marches by Rory Stewart’ and ‘Saint Augustine’s Confessions’ – translated by Henry Chadwick my ‘Lenten reading’ and – ‘Lines in the Sand’ by A A Gill – not started yet.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

Becoming completely absorbed in the work and experiencing the haecceity [ed: look this one up!] of the piece.

Robert davies2 Robert davies 3

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The 60/60 Project ⌗5

Adam Garratt

Exhibiting at TOPOS

Adam Garratt portrait Adam Garratt 2 Adam garratt 1

Where do you find inspiration?

Brutal Architecture, Repeat processes, Urban banal

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

I learned to screen print while studying in Rotterdam, NL. The creativity there was different & exciting. I printed basic bold architectural images. This has carried through my practice. As a child I was mesmerised with a tall block of flats near my house. Standing beneath them looking up scared me & filled me with wonder.

What do you listen to when you’re working?

Podcasts (Crime town, Criminal or Reveal normally) if I don’t have to read. Or music. Something chilled out like Nao, The XX or Bonobo recently.

Does research play a role in your process?

Research into modular construction has been important recently, as precast concrete buildings have been the focus of my work. A history into Modernist architecture, Brutalism & planned cities has helped to understand the subject. It has also been important for me to look into site specificity as I would like to go forward with work inside the buildings that inspire me.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

Thread. I made a series of sewn book works that were made entirely buy sewing through pages. Once the books are opened & the pages turned, geometric forms are revealed. Getting tension in the thread was so difficult as the drawings had to be precise to create the lines of the drawings.

What’s your favourite tool?

Screen-printing Squeegee. Its super ergonomic, really simple, usually a bright colour & entirely fit for purpose in adding paint to a surface.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

A sense of repeat process & a love for our ‘ugly’ concrete buildings. Every box in my installation was hand printed, folded & put in place by me. It looks basic due to the limited materials but that’s the difficult part.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.

I’ve learned of the film Play time by Jaques Tati. It’s wonderful.

What are you looking forward to this year?

Im looking forward to making & installing work for AWE at TOPOS. There is a period before the show where I will have to print, transport & construct the work. I will become a human production line.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

It’s a compulsion really so as much as I enjoy it I cant pin point why. I guess repetition is something enjoyable. Its an easy way to mark progress & production. I enjoy representing form & image. We all read space I like to play with that as a visual text.

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The 60/60 Project ⌗4

Martin Staniforth

Exhibiting the “Clarence Phoenix” on Cathedral Green

Morth wood Morth portraitMorth5

Where do you find inspiration

Growth after disaster; current affairs; organic forms in nature

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

Brene Brown’s TED talk on vulnerability started me thinking about how to tell a more interesting story when sculpting with life models. Seeing nature try to take over man-made structures in Tower Hamlets cemetery, and on the high tide line of plastic rubbish in Costa Rica, has encouraged me to explore the theme of renewal.

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?

I have an idea, but not the details. Then I procrastinate. I gather materials. Then I procrastinate a bit more. Then I get stuck in for a few days at a time and wonder what took me so long to get started.

What is something that you have recently researched?

How to make the plaque for ‘Clarence Phoenix’ in a way that echoes the medium of the sculpture.

What’s your favourite tool?

A metal clay shaper with gentle curves at each end and a rough tooth finish. It allows clay to be evened out yet does not overly smooth things.

 What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

Burnt timbers up to 4 metres long. There are structural challenges as, while the cores should be strong, the outer burnt parts are less so. Also there’s a delicacy to the surface ‘scales’ that I want to keep, yet they are easily knocked off during the shaping and transportation process. Burnt wood is a messy medium.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

PACE London – Transcending Boundaries. This show used sensors and digital projections to plant seeds on the viewers, that then grew into plants. In another room a digital waterfall and stream flowed. If you stood in it, it flowed around you. And then butterflies would land on your shoulder. It ended in early March.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.

Paper clay allows a sculptor to make incredibly fine pieces. It’s a miracle material.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.

The Glorious Art House on Fore Street. Wonderful cakes, huge smiles and a huge felted grandfather clock.

Morth portrait 2 Morth 4 Morth 3

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The 60/60 Project ⌗3

Sarah Thomas

Exhibiting: Plume – Excess – Refine – Repeat at the Boat Shed, Exeter Quay

Sarah Thomas1 Sarah Thomas 3 Sarah Thomas 2

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

I have been very fortunate and able to travel and live around the world from Maine USA with its big skies and wilderness to Varanasi India with its chaos and colour.

Who are your influences?

I have so many influences but the most intense is Phyllida Barlow, I love her use of scrap materials and large scale. Grayson Perry is also an influence, in particular his British museum exhibition The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman. A visit to any DIY store gets me very excited!

What do you listen to when you’re working?

I am totally obsessed with Radio 4! Turning the radio on is the first thing I do and it is the last thing I do at night.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

For the work that I will be showing during AWE I have been researching birds of paradise, 18th Century fabric and a lot of material and technique research.

What’s your favourite tool?

I have two favourite tools and I use both to draw with, my Wacom digital drawing pad and router.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

I want to evoke feelings of disorientation and unease whilst also creating elation and joy through my use of materials and colour.

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art?

To a point all of the work that I have made has some regret. There’s always something that could have been improved and done differently. This is what keeps me making.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.

I have been recently researching Socratic questioning a technique that I can use in my role as a lecturer.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

I enjoy and find it incredibly frustrating how I can go off on tangents, linking random ideas together. This way of working I think keeps me interested, giving the work certain energy.

Sarah Thomas 6 Sarah Thomas 5 Sarah Thomas 4

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The 60/60 Project ⌗2

Rosie King 

Sister, Sister exhibition at TOPOS

Rosie King

Where do you find inspiration?

People and the places they inhabit, especially in Plymouth where I live and work.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

More of a bashed up A6 notebook. It has coloured pages, scribbles, measurements, doodles, and diagrams. Plus a few drawings of people asleep in train stations.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

Moving to Plymouth gave me a deep interest in place-making because I became aware of this city that sometimes has a troubled relationship with its history and yet is going through regeneration.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

Yes, although it takes different forms. Sometimes it’s books and writing, but sometimes it’s collecting data or doing an audit of a space. Recently it’s been maps and tools for measuring and predicting coastal erosion.

What’s your favourite tool?

I’m currently enjoying Google mapping apps like Streetview and My Maps.

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?

It pains me to say it, but it would be my laptop.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

I’ve been thinking a lot about Bedwyr Williams film Tyrrau Mawr (Big Towers), which was shown during the Artes Mundi. It was so human.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?

‘Her work is sweet’, I’m still lost for words.

What are you looking forward to this year?

Exhibiting with the Sister, Sister lot again for Art Week Exeter. Finishing a book on architectural walks around Plymouth. Making a film as the outcome for a research project in North Devon that I’ve been working on for ages.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

The moment after some brain frying when briefly everything becomes clear.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?

Some new short films in the fabulous setting of TOPOS.

Rosie King best-bench-awards-2015-st-saviours Rosie King bridge_at_st_georges_place-5 rosie-king-the-evidence-of-the-everyday-once-was-here-2016-sun-rain-wind-concrete-270-413cmIMG_3513

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The 60/60 Project ⌗1

Rebecca Harris

Storm in a B Cup: a story of breasts

Exhibiting at EVA Studios

rebecca harris RebeccaHarrisLifeSucksonasilverplatter2016RebeccaHarrisStorminaBCup2017

Where do you find inspiration?

The body, craft and society. How we perceive each other and how that impacts on our perceptions of ourselves. How textiles and craft can convey meanings of a theme in different ways than other material might.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

[My] formative years as a child play a heavy role in what I do now. Seeing how my body lost its gender neutrality and how I was gazed upon, treated as not just a woman but an overweight one too, really impacts on how you experience your physical and psychological presence in the world. I have always been introverted and as a teen I loved spending time at home, sketching and creating…. It was in recent years that the medium my artwork takes, textiles, got more and more feedback on nostalgia being brought to the audience and its tactile affect. This draws me closer to wanting to explore this further. It’s not just I want to make work about the body and that it just happens to be made from textiles, I now realise that it’s about the audience’s body too, how they are physical beings perceiving that art…

Who are your influences?

The audience, what they feedback about the work, in terms of stories they want to share, how they react/affected by seeing the work. In terms of other artists it definitely has to be Louise Bourgeois for her use of textiles and her personal experiences in her work, how touching her pieces are. You do not need to know anything of the artist to be affected by her art, they talk to the viewer of something of themselves. There are many other artist I draw from too for influence: Eva Hesse, Tracey Emin, Mona Hatoum, Doris Salcedo and Rachel Whiteread.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

Latex! It’s messy and smelly. During the first year of my MA I made work about loss of home, again drawing from the personal. I wanted to make an indexical trace off the side of my new home, an apex shaped brick wall with no windows. So I aimed to paint to whole wall with latex through sheeting of muslin. I was a mess and it was such hard work. I found it frustrating to work with that and it was a shame it’s difficult to store. Eva Hesse did a lot of work with the material in the 60s and I understand conservation of this has been rather difficult. It raises interesting questions though about permanence of work.

What’s your favourite tool?

At the moment it is a crochet hook, I am making lots and lots of nipples and doilies with the tool. A couple of years ago it would have been an embroidery needle as I was sewing thousands and thousands of French Knots in my Eden Project commission. In both cases my fingers suffer.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

Emily Speed at the Exeter Phoenix a couple of weeks ago. I really like how she works with interpreting architecture through the body and vice versa.

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art?

I think every artist does. I tried my hand at painting a year or so ago, I obtained some fresh offal from my local abattoir at the time when I was living in Cornwall. Up to this point I had been making works about the inside and outside of the body but always relied on photos or anatomical drawings. I wanted to experience the actual material.   I was going to paint them on a platter and make it intriguing and beautiful. I still can’t tell if they are good or bad paintings; so I called them ‘A Series of Offal Paintings #1’ etc.

What are you looking forward to this year?

Getting boobs out of my system! That I am doing my first show here in Exeter after only moving her in the autumn. I am really excited about sharing my work here and getting to know more people of the city and what further cool things are going on.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

Play! That exploration of materials, seeing what is conveyed through materials, having a conversation as such with them as I discover them. I love making the magic of piecing things together and getting that jolt of laughter or surprise and know that’s it, cracked that piece.

RebeccaHarrisSymbiosis2015  RebeccaHarrisDuctscolouringpage2017   RebeccaHarrisLifeSucks2016

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60/60 Project

From 23rd March, we’re going to be launching the 60/60 Project: 60 contributing local artists in 60 days, taking us right through #AWExeter!

Get your slice of free publicity and a virtual exhibition space right here

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TRIPP_cresting

Open for business…

Plans are well under way for the next Art Week Exeter, taking place 13–21 May 2017. More information (and a new website) will follow in March 2017.

Artists

Share your latest masterpiece or exhibit the body of work that you’ve been developing, use your own studio, your home, a local venue or a striking and unusual space. We’re here to help you ensure you’ve got the right space and support you to make it the best it can be.

— To list your exhibition/event in the AWE programme, go to artweekexeter.org.uk/registration. The registration deadline for the printed programme has now passed. New registrations can be submitted but will be shown on the website only.

— To register for a pitch at the Art Car Boot Sale and the Crafty Shed (both taking place on 14 May 2017, on Exeter’s quayside), please complete and return this form.

 

Curators

Have you got that killer idea for a show up your sleeve? We’ll be on hand to amplify your call-out to artists, sourcing the kit and finding the right venue.

— To find out more, please email create@artweekexeter.org.uk.

— To list your exhibition/event in the AWE programme, go to artweekexeter.org.uk/registration.

Producers

Are you looking to host an inter/national-level artist in the city? What sort of help might you like to make it happen? We’re offering a heap of in-kind benefits that should make your funding bid sing.

— To find out more, please email create@artweekexeter.org.uk.

Sponsors

We are developing a blend of public and private finance that should sit well with your CSR or philanthropic aims or just offer a fresh and engaging positive association for your company. We have opportunities to co-brand the whole event or selective aspects. We’re also fostering relationships (on a no-fee basis) directly with cultural producers, to ensure ethical parity and a high quality of work make this event something you’ll be proud to be a part of.

— Download our sponsorship and advertising pack.

— To find out more, please email engage@artweekexeter.org.uk.

In 2016, AWE featured 101 events across 56 venues. You can still browse the AWE 2016 programme here.

Art Week Exeter CIC is a community interest company limited by guarantee, number 10387974, with directors drawn from business and the arts. Registered address: Bradninch Place, Gandy Street, Exeter, EX4 3LS.