The 60/60 Project ⌗ 33 Julian McSweeney

Julian McSweeney

Curating the work of Winnie Chan.

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Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

I use a Jotta notebook as a journal, which also acts as my sketchbook.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

Childhood memories, as well as documentary and art history references from my childhood.

Who are your influences?

Edgar Degas, Vincent Van Gogh, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Man Ray, LS Lowry, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Frank Stella, Robert Smithson, Richard Long, Don McCullin, Richard Hamilton, Jack Milroy (and too many others to mention).

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?

I don’t like working in an ad hoc way. I need to have order. So preparing my materials and workspace is a routine I always go through.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

Research is massively important to my practice. I recently researched China during the reign of Mao Zedong.

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?

My hand-made wooden setsquare.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

Hilma af Klint: Painting the Unseen, at the Serpentine Gallery in London.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

I like challenging people’s assumptions, or perhaps linking apparently unconnected events. Though if I can provide any sort of meaningful experience to the viewer then that’s good enough for me.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?

A painter I very much admired once told me one of my paintings was ‘smashing’, which gave me a real boost.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

I enjoy pretty much every aspect of making work, from coming up with a concept or idea, the initial research involved, and seeing the idea take shape through the process of making, and communicating that idea to an audience. Recording images and editing them down is also a process I enjoy. The better you are as a photographer or filmmaker, the harder the editing and decision-making becomes.

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The 60/60 Project #32 Clare Bryden

Performing “Songs in the Neighbourhood“, to be sung walking around the estate with the Composers’ names in Exeter: Broadfield Road, St Loyes 16th May 7.30-9pm & at her Open Studio, 1 Miller Close.

The Particulart Exeter exhibition, Up in the Air, on disply at the Gloriouse Art House in Exeter  GreenBlue - Drop Slow Tears - Exe

Where do you find inspiration?
My place, choral music, science, data, environment, anything that interests me!

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
I draw on childhood play; my love of making good music with other singers; previous roles at the Met Office and other environmental work; contemplative prayer and being attentive; reading, watching, listening; generally taking an interest.

Who are your influences?
Any creative person who has given me an insight into their process, not to be copied but as an encouragement to plough my own furrow.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
Always! Fairly recently, whether the Environment Agency has any data on projected risk of flooding under climate change scenarios. More recently, what are the boundaries of the St Loyes ward.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Chiffon fabric.

What’s your favourite tool?
Beautiful smooth bamboo knitting needles, a present from friends.

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art
?
Plenty that’s not good. None that I regret, as it’s always a learning process.


Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you
?
“You’ve got me thinking again – thank you” and “Weird in a good way”.

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?
Iain McGilChrist “The Master and His Emissary”, which argues that the division of the brain into two hemispheres is essential to human existence, making possible incompatible versions of the world, with quite different priorities and values.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
My studio, aka garage. I’m slightly nervous, as no-one may come because it’s way out of town, but mainly because it’s about opening up and being vulnerable to my neighbours.

Soul Cube - both sides  clare brydon

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The 60/60 Project ⌗31 Alysa Freeman

Alysa Freeman

Showing with Catherine Cartwright at Kalider

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Where do you find inspiration?

My current work is in response to images involving political protest that have gone viral.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

I have always found drawing on blank pages very daunting, especially in a new sketchbook. I use a variety of papers, often recycled and gather these together into books. 

Who are your influences?

I am influenced by what is happening around me. Whether that is news stories, places I am visiting or interesting textures. As an object and jewellery maker how something feels is important to me. I often pick up found objects because I find something in the texture I think is pleasing.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

As an MA student, research is a critical part of my work. I have most recently been working with images of anti fascist protester Tess Asplund that went viral last year.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

I have been working with paper lately, which is a very different material to work with than the silver and copper I am used to. It has been interesting getting to grips with something so delicate and malleable.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

I went to see Collect at the Saatchi Gallery, which is always interesting. This year I was particularly interested by the work of Simone Pheulpin, who layers fabric to create beautiful and intricate sculptures. 

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.

I have taught myself to make paper this year. It has been really exciting getting to grips with a new material. 

What are you looking forward to this year?

Spending lots of time out and about in the campervan

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?

This will be the first time I have been part of AWE and the first time I have shown my work in Exeter. This exhibition is a chance for me to get some feedback on my current work and help inform my final project in my MA. 

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The 60/60 Project #30: Susan Thomson

Susan Thomson

Showing with Myriam Prual at 13 Greatwood Terrace, Topsham.

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What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
I am a watercolour botanical artist so am drawn to flowers of all sorts, but I like to free up using print, silk painting and other media. It is exciting to create an unexpected image.


Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?

Be very calm. I can’t paint with my mind all over the place.

What do you listen to when you’re working?
Soft music no words.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
Types of Marigold for a commission.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Silk.


Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?

As many paintings as I can carry.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
A porcelain bowl with flowers all round the top by Liz Watts. It was incredibly beautiful.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
Someone told me to look at my work was a healing experience.

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?
I am reading Morse Code Wrens of Station X by Anne Glyn-Jones

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.
I love to drift off into my own world where only my work and I exist.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.
Visit the roof tour in Exeter Cathedral. Fascinating.

 

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The 60/60 Project #29: Juneau Projects

Juneau Projects

Residency with Spacex and exhibiting in the Pavilion as “Makers of the Multiverse” on Piazza Terracina during #AWExeter

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Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.
We do – it’s a series of links, photos, notes and videos that we post on a private blog page.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
Mainly stories that Adam Sutherland from Grizedale Arts has told us about the seventies. We also had a shared dream about a unicorn once.

Who are your influences?
Rudy Rucker, Bernard Leach, Cave Art, the apocalypse, British Wildlife, Jesse Rae, Folk Art, people.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
Yes, we have been researching 3D printing and augmented reality recently.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
A passenger jet plane

What’s your favourite tool?
It’s a draw between laser cutter and pencil

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?
Our collection of charity shop pottery finds.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
‘The Clearing’ by Alex Hartley and Tom James at Compton Verney.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?
A multiple!

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art?
Yes, we call it ‘The Clown Face’ and look at it whenever we need grounding.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
“The Jackass TV of contemporary art” (from Channel 5 documentary on British Art Show 6)

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
In 1978 a team of geologists discovered a family of five living deep in the Siberian forest, 150 miles from the nearest village. They had lived there entirely on their own since 1936.

What are you looking forward to this year?
Spending time in Exeter!

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?
The Memorial Device’ by David Keenan and ‘The Story of The Streets’ by Mike Skinner.

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The 60/60 Project #28: Superact – Patsy Lang

Superact – Patsy Lang

EXE-ARTS final exhibition and workshop at Exeter Community Centre, Sat 13 May 11am-5pm

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Where do you find inspiration?

EXE-ARTS is a community arts initiative to inspire anyone in the community to participate in creative activity with professional artists running a variety of arts activity.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

Superact has run a number of research projects on the effects of creative activity on various groups including, offenders, young at risk, and the elderly. Our projects are all about delivering activity and gathering evidence on its affect on the participants. One major research project was carried out with UWE (University of the West of England) on the affects of music on the identity of the young offender. This was a 3-year project. Recently we have been a partner in an EU Project, Handmade Wellbeing, about the use or art & craft in Elderly residential settings.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

Our Exe-Arts workshops use a variety of materials, paint, clay, fabric, felt, tissue, cane, but I think the most challenging has been Willow. It is the most unusual material and methods for the participants.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

I was recently in Estonia for our Handmade Wellbeing project and visited an exhibition of Naive art. Some of it was based on legends of the region and some on the everyday life of the people. One famous works of women eating strawberries had inspired the town to put sculptures of giant strawberries throughout the town. it was nice to see the art inspire the town.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

It is important to show the audience that anyone can be and are creative. We all have it in us and our exhibition will demonstrate this with work from across the community of all ages, backgrounds and skills.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.

If you walk up to the top of the hill on the grounds of Killerton House you will find an enormous tree that came down in the storms of a few years ago. It was perfectly healthy and huge. It is sad to see it on the ground and it makes you think of the forces needed to bring it down. Humbling.

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The 60/60 Project #27: Anthi Kay

Anthi Kay

Showing at Sail Loft Studio with Caroline Hart.

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Where do you find inspiration?
Everything around me. The love of beautiful things around us in nature and architecture is an inspiration.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.
It’s full of shapes and textures and lots of my photography

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?
My mood really has an effect on my work, so it’s not a good day I change the music and make it better.

What do you listen to when you’re working?
Lots of Music, I always have music playing in the house. I’m a better person for having music around me I’m sure, but my tastes are quite broad from Motown, Elvis , Bowie, massive attack, Marvin Gaye and The xx and dance music. It doesn’t stop there by any means ..

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
I mainly take in my surrounding and use my photography as an inspiration to make ideas flow. I love European cities and coasts, the colour and scenery is very different to home but my family is from Cyprus so I am drawn to different cultures and Mediterranean warmth.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Porcelain, it has a greatness and difficulty in both measures.

What’s your favourite tool?
My fingers and a Rubber kidney…

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
We recently visited Barcelona with the children and it wasn’t one exhibition but just sharing the amazing city with the them for their first visit. Culturally, architecturally and artistically it will stay with them as it always has with me.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
It makes me happy to have it in my home and look at it everyday’! ….

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
That my work is ever changing and I should give into it…. It’s a good thing.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.
I live by the River Exe in Topsham which is ever changing in colour and wildlife. Being on the water is a very calming and we are lucky to live here. I’m originally from London so it’s hugely different, but then sometimes quite similar, as I see London as a collection of small villages too. The cycle path that runs on both sides of the river is a great addition and a fabulous way to see your surroundings, it slows down the pace of life considerably (at the pace I cycle).

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
“A river runs through it” series . At present a work in progress. Watch this space.

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The 60/60 Project #26: Andrew Ralph Baynham Simpson

Andrew Ralph Baynham Simpson

Showing at St Anne’s Chapel, 3 Old Tiverton Road, outside the Orthodox Church, Top of Sidwell St. EX4 6LA

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Where do you find inspiration?
It varies from Van Gogh to Turner to Cezanne to Carravagio to Robert Taylor, the aircraft illustrator.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
I studied architectural design for years which had a big influence, especially about using grids and perspective. My dad was a Lancaster pilot so I used to do loads of pictures of Lancs and other aircraft. I also helped Andy Alleyard do one of the paintings outside the Barnfield Theatre – the one of the Dickensian fiddler in a top hat standing in a doorway. I am also a Christian and helped my friend Simon Edwards paint the full height backdrop for the Nativity Play at the Riverside Christian Centre. So – Lancs, Caravaggio and Jesus!

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?
What I try and do is do a red ground or other colour to kick off. When doing landscapes outside I started using reverse colours or complementary colours, just to get away from copying what I saw. I also tried painting with my right eye closed. Because I was strong on my right side my left eye would be correspondingly stronger.

What do you listen to when you’re working?
The ‘still small voice ‘ – you’ll have to ask me about it. I also like Chuck Berry, J. S. Bach and Andrew Lloyd Webber as well as 60s stuff.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
Keating’s stuff with research on how the Old Masters and Vincent painted. This has really helped with the Caravaggio and and an interpretation of ‘The Fighting Temeraire’ I’m hoping to do. Abstract pics don’t interest me too much.

What’s your favourite tool?
I do woodcarving, and found the Router extremely useful when making tables.

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art?
I did a couple of A4 landscapes which were absolute crap some time ago. I also displayed a small painting of the rock group Cream in Exeter Library once, which I felt the ladies in the staff frowned upon.

What are you looking forward to this year?
Difficult one: either having babies or pushing up daisies – not at once.

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?
One writer I found interested me was Mike Tomkies, who was a journalist in Hollywood in the 60s then gave it all up to eventually live on a remote Scottish island for over 20 years – alone studying wildlife.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.
The Jewish synagogue or the Russian Orthodox church.

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The 60/60 Project ⌗25: Naomi Hart

Naomi Hart http://naomi-hart.com

The Waters Wide” at Cartridges Law

Naomi Hart on an icefloe Greenland Photo Ron Pfister  The things which I have seen, Naomi Hart

Where do you find inspiration?

In almost anything!

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

The everyday, soft-back, A5: notes, scribbles, words, lines, people, scenes, books. Anything and everything jotted down, and longer sketches when I have time. The travel sketchbook – ‘carnet de voyage’ – more involved sketches, paintings, overheard conversations and things I just want to remember from a journey.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

Staring at birds for hours on end, swimming outdoors, travel. Fragmented memories of my life and words/pictures of other people’s lives.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

The journey is often the research. Otherwise birds are a recurring theme: currently on swifts – they don’t land for the first two years of their lives, and sleep on the wing, by shutting down one half of their brain at a time.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

Molten glass – a room-size installation of 10,000 pieces of hand-pulled glass, about 3 metres long, which I had to get straight, and then once they were cooled, bend the ends of every single piece over using a blowtorch.

What’s your favourite tool?

Biro

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?

The travel sketchbooks. They are memory and inspiration in one.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

Does mind-blowing count? Anselm Kiefer’s latest – Valhalla. Entire lead-lined rooms and vast paintings with molten lead and colour.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

Being transported out of where they are and into another world for a while.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?

That the cards made from some of my paintings make very good bereavement cards – I think she meant it in a nice way!

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

That when I’m doing it properly, nothing else matters.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.

The memorial to Grace Darling in St Thomas

Naomi Hart 4 The Island, acrylic on board, 30cm x 30cm , 2009Naomi Hart All About Migration shadows IMG_3576

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The 60/60 Project #24: Laura Henning

Laura Henning

Showing her creative portraiture at The Barnfield Theatre 

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Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.
I keep a box of ideas and cuttings.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
I did portraits at GCSE and A Level Art.

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?
Have to be encaptured by the idea of who I am painting and will often listen to their music/ programme / film whilst painting them.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Working with old photographic images, which are unclear or dark.

What’s your favourite tool?
A plasterer’s palette knife.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
Jimmy Law – Expressive portraits.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?
A sense of fun and recognition.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
I’ve learned to be bold with my own style and to not doubt it or let other influences sway me into trying to be more refined as then I lose my sense of freedom, enjoyment and my paintings become rigid and lose their vitality.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.
Not knowing how a painting is going to turn out … by letting my creative abilities take over and lead the way.

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