The 60/60 Project #60 Richard Rochester

Richard Rochester

Showing at Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital

IMG_3832 IMG_3835

Where do you find inspiration?
Most recently , really close to home – on my doorstep, increasing my awareness of what’s in striking distance from my home. the Quay has amazing Swans, Cormorants, Moor Hens and where the flood defence work has opened up much of that area.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.
Generally speaking I normally use are the Moleskine A6 ones with squared paper – I sketch from the front and write from the back. A lot of it is working out dimensions of things, numbers with a fine pencil.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
My Mum was an artist, she showed me work by people like Durer, Turner, Breugel – she was a key influence in my development. I loved things like Durer’s animals, but his small monogram as well. And the self-confident self portraits, there’s something about these artists that when I saw their work as a kid I thought ‘Wow – there’s someone who knows his place in the world.’
And the ‘Hunters in the Snow’ – being out with my air rifle, I could relate to that!

Who are your influences?
At the moment – Gerhard Richter, Winslow Homer- his depth of colour, but I love Clyfford Still, but also the subtle stuff – Reinhardt with his black… Rothko…

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?
I like to clear all those little chores, tie up the loose ends and it’s 4 in the afternoon when I feel, ‘Now’s the time for work’. I’m trying to be strict about distracting things – non-urgent emails. A good audio book, music, and a whiskey!

What do you listen to when you’re working?
Currently = Sapiens: ‘A Brief History of Humankind’ by Yuval Noah Harari‎ and Andrew Marr’s ‘History of the World’ – both staggering pieces of work that take you into a different space – you question what it is to be human and your place in history, and what the point is… The more you listen to this stuff – you either go massively large or into miniscule, focussed work.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
Spending time out as possible – soaking things up, taking them in – in a wood or river, just sitting and less rushing. And a lot of photography. Processes – I’ve been studying about tools and processes for printmaking – things that suit my style of work and where I want to take it – Mezzotint – excites me, I’m exploring that. Pinterest is a great tool for that – I can spend hours checking out what other people have done so far in the field.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
I like to push the boundaries, meeting those challenges – running watercolours through airbrushes,

What’s your favourite tool?
I’m really pleased with a set of Sailmaker’s needles that I got from George Stuart from Lympstone back when I had a boat. They’re great for drypoint – I found out recently – I’ve had them for years, just waiting in my sewing kit! The flat face means you can scratch, burnish – so simple. And they live in this lovely scrap of waxed paper from the sailmakers…

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?
Sometimes the most banal things can be interesting or even beautiful if you just stop and look..

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
I love the comments that get written in the book at shows – ‘Stunning’ ‘Fantastic’ Someone once gave me a whole raft of provocations – ‘Go abstract! Ditch the charcoal! Get Dirty!’
But the most common occurrence is ‘Inspiring’ – I hear from people who leave the show and go home and engage with making art, or follow their own interest, give it a go.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
Keep it simple – I’ve historically spent a lot of time on things that haven’t been better artworks for it. On a big scale people will forgive loose marks, but smaller work needs to be created with light touch and kept simple.

What are you looking forward to this year?
As Artist in Residence for Devon Wildlife Trust – getting down to Salcombe, some quality time there and at Bystock. Time in the kayak, soaking it all up! Playing with colour.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.
Meeth quarry, near Okehampton, a DWT reserve. It’s a very tranquil old clay quarry – the light reflected from the bottom of the quarry is a beautiful turquoise, and it’s flat, accessible for walking, you can sit in the bird hide.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
The introduction of colour – I’ve been a monochromist for so long! And bringing drypoint into my repertoire, it feels like I’ve been given license to experiment!

IMG_3834 IMG_3833

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

The 60/60 Project #59 Flora Bamford

Flora Bamford

Showing at Double Elephant

IMG_3826 IMG_3827

Where do you find inspiration?
Absolutely anywhere. I’m drawn towards colours and their relationship to one another

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
I did a BA in photography in my 20s where I discovered the technique of making colour photograms. The colours in those images of plants were amazing

Who are your influences?
18th Century silhouette artists

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?
I’m a busy mum so just can’t wait to get the chores out of the way before I get into my studio, so my ritual is running for that studio door!

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Probably colour cibachrome photo paper

What’s your favourite tool?
A scalple

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing
?
An installation and film by Bela Tar in Amsterdam

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
Recently a friend said ” this work is strong” that made me happy

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?
Elena Ferrante. My brilliant friend

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

Being absorbed in creativity

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.
I loved cycling to The Turf. You feel the history.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
I haven’t shown any work for some years so that is exciting, and exhibiting with a group at Double Elephant.

IMG_3828 IMG_3829

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

The 60/60 Project #58 Corinna Spencer

Corinna Spencer

Showing at Exeter Phoenix

Corinna Spencer - Newlyn - What Is This Place Corinna Spencer After Pollard - 2016
Where do you find inspiration?
National Trust Properties, Film, Television, Novels.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
Museum visits, National Trust Visits.

Who are your influences?
Victorian photography, Goya, Theatre

What do you listen to when you’re working?
I prefer to have documentaries playing: Science, Nature, Arts

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
Yes, usually historical stories about women.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Water Colour

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
America After The Fall: Paintings In The 1930’s at The Royal Academy

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?
That it wasn’t boring.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
Three day old giraffes are really rather tall.

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?
Currently Reading The Muse by Jesse Burton

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.
Escape.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
Paintings from the 1000 portraits made for Strange And Romantic at Exeter Phoenix.

Corinna Spencer -The Lady - 2017 IMG_3824

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

The 60/60 Project #57 Amy McCarthy

Amy McCarthy

Showing at the Library

IMG_3806 IMG_3805

Where do you find inspiration?
Nature, the sea, music, people…everywhere really!

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
I think every art work is a kind of culmination of all our experiences. However, I have recently completed a piece for Exeter University’s Observatory Exhibition. This is a reflection of my family’s experiences of being Jewish refugees in WW2 and how being holocaust survivors affected them, and therefore my world view. This is the first time I have directly taken from my own life in this way in my art ad has been quite a cathartic experience. I come from a family with a rich and interesting history and I will certainly be telling more of my ancestors stories in the future.

Who are your influences?
I have many influences, but currently it’s Grayson Perry for how he weaves politics, humour and craftsmanship.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
I have done several historical projects that take a lot of research. I have recently researched my family for the piece mentioned above and I am currently finishing a WWI war memorial which I made with Teigmouth Community School, all about Teignmouth in WWI. This project led me to quite detailed research into life in Devon in 1914-18 and the children also did their own research, we brought all this together and drew pictures reflecting life 100 years ago.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
I work with glass, it is constantly challenging!

What’s your favourite tool?
I have a fid (small tool for opening lead came) which was gifted to me on the death of another glass artist by her family. It is just the right size and shape.

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?
My kiln (I have several strong men in the studio to help me carry it out obviously)

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
Martin Staniforth’s #HopeandRenewal on the Cathedral Green.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
How to weave willow.

What are you looking forward to this year?
Running recycled art workshops at Lemonfest, getting TRAIL 2017 launched in July and an email from my client in the USA, to say the large commission stained glass window arrived safely.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.
I get to be creative all day, every day and get paid for it! Also glass is such a wide medium there are always new techniques, materials and ideas to try out.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
My cast glass bee in the Library Cabinet, it is taken from the Life of Bees from the rare book collection and is the most complicated/detailed casting I have created to date.

IMG_3804 IMG_3807

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

 

The 60/60 Project #56 Veronica Gosling

Veronica Gosling

Showing at her gallery, Studio 36

IMG_3802 IMG_3803

Where do you find inspiration?
Tree branches and the conversations of strangers.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
Humorous and dramatic personal experiences.

Who are your influences?
Picasso and people with such free and imaginative outlooks.

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?
One lit but unsmoked cigarette, a walk round the garden and checking the progress of tadpoles.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Resin and fibre glass

What’s your favourite tool?
A lump hammer

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
Steven Bramble’s portrait of Dylan Thomas

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?
That they can do just as well themselves.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
Just a lot of rubbish isn’t it!’ (about my recycled sculpture)

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
Not to take too much notice of what other people are saying.

What are you looking forward to this year?
Working with some more rubbish.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.
Oldridge Church near Crediton.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
The tadpoles.

 

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

The 60/60 Project #55 Janet Sainsbury

Janet Sainsbury

Showing at PS45 Gallery

porthmeor

Where do you find inspiration?
Other artists and all around me, walking down the street, people, memories, conversations, songs, news, films, youtube.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.
Yes, I work in several different books at once. I write lots of notes and jot down ideas, words & phrases as they come into my head. I draw people when I’m on the train or waiting somewhere.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
Childhood memories and experience of growing up in a seaside town.

Who are your influences?
Painters I’m currently looking at include: Marlene Dumas, Maria Lassnig, Mamma Andersson.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?Researching the Newlyn School from 1800’s and themes in Cornish art from this period, this fed into a series of paintings.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Spaghetti.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?Two inspiring shows at Exeter Phoenix recently: Emily Speed and Eleanor Moreton, both created beautiful work that has stayed with me.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
“I used to paint like that.”

What are you looking forward to this year?
I’m currently doing a course with Turps Banana, I am looking forward to continuing with this and developing a body of work to show next year.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit. When the tide is low walk from Lympstone along the estuary towards Exmouth, look down and you will see lots of fragments of china amongst the pebbles.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
I’m looking forward to working with PSU during AWE, we will be at PS45 gallery presenting the Random Art Machine and on Thursday 18th we will be leading a walk along the Exe called 5 Bridges and a Waffle.  I’m also looking forward to showing 3 multiples in Juneau Projects Makers of the Multiverse pavilion – small books of drawings and a fortune teller.  

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter and ⌗60artx60

The 60/60 Project #54 Volkhardt Mueller

Volkhardt Mueller

Showing Broadcasts from the Edge of the Horizon – The Beacon at TOPOS

 IMG_3785 IMG_3788

Where do you find inspiration?

In life, politics and art

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

I used to keep a sketch book. Now I draw to think mostly, these drawings I rarely keep.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

The world around me and how people shape it

Who are your influences?

Human ingenuity and craft, the human condition as it is documented through histories.

Do you have any rituals or routines before making work?

For the parts that involve manual work I enjoy keeping my tools in top condition.

Tool maintenance is a form of mental preparation

What do you listen to when you’re working?

It depends what I am working on. Mostly the voices of life and politics, bits of R4 and various German radio stations such as Deutschlandfunk, SWR2 and HR. Sometimes I pick some music, it’s got to be silence if I have to concentrate.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

Most of it is research. Recently I’ve been looking into dialects and how people relate to them

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?

The implementation of concepts can be challenging, the period between research and implementation can be straightforward but it can also be full of uncertainty up to the last minute. In terms of process I rarely perceive materials as challenging per se.

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?

The bike I have been cycling on for the last 25 years

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

Most recently that would be “Manifesto”, a series of video pieces by Julian Rosefeldt.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?

If the work reaches people in some way that will usually do for me.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.

I have been making a concerted effort to expand my English vocab. Something apocryphal for example is of doubtful authenticity…

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?

Der Abenteuerliche Simplicissimus – in its English translation “Simplicius Simplicissimus”

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

The making stages, mostly

 IMG_3787 IMG_3786

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

 

The 60/60 Project #53 Elizabeth Jardine

Elizabeth Jardine

Showing “Waterline” at EVA Studios

IMG_3755 IMG_3760

Where do you find inspiration?
I’m interested in the ways we connect to our environment. I go off on long walks, usually researching a particular place or journey. I look for images and metaphors along the way.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.
Walking for multiple days and weeks has streamlined my pencil-case in a bid to travel light. I make notes and use a camera and video camera.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
I’m interested in the ways we belong, and the spaces in-between places we feel a connection to. My first long walk was from my childhood home in Lewes, Sussex, to my University home in Falmouth, Cornwall. It was a long way! Walking somehow allows you to access the layers of time and history embedded in the landscape, while mapping your own memories onto a place.

Who are your influences?
Paintings: Peter Doing, Michael Porter and Anselm Keiffer. Films: Andrej Tarchovsky, Patrick Keiller, Bill Viola. Words: Robert McFarlane, Rebecca Solnitt and WG Sebald.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
I really enjoy responding to site and researching a particular place. It enriches my own experience of a place and adds depth and meaning to my work. It also allows my work to develop in unpredictable ways… very freeing.

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
Time! Never enough of it. And space, I need a teleporter.

What’s your favourite tool?
My little tent, which allows me to make my home almost anywhere in the name of art!

Your studio’s on fire – what are you grabbing as you run out the door?
This week- my otter for the Moor Otters project, I have spent months visiting all the rivers on Dartmoor, collecting soil samples from the riverbanks to make into paint to decorate it. It is surprisingly adorable for an object covered with mud!

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
I really enjoyed the exhibition at RAM (fairly recent) with Kurt Jackson revisiting locations of etchings by Turner.

What is one thing you hope people will take away from experiencing your work?
I hope people will be inspired to go track down places on maps.

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art?
As Grayson Perry says: the bins of art schools are home to some of the ugliest things imaginable. That said, I regret nothing; each work makes way for the next.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
The painter Virginia Verran once told me very seriously that she thought I was a real artist. It meant a lot, especially coming from someone for whom I have so much respect, and I try to remember it at times when paintings are misbehaving.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
Every day is a school day! I’ve learned a lot about rivers recently…They are all so different. I’ve also been learning to kayak, which has had a big impact on the way I connect to landscape, and is starting to filter into my work.

What are you looking forward to this year?
As well as AWE I am making work with the Granite Elements Collective, which will be exhibited in September at Yarner Wood and the Devon Guild. I have an exhibition in Japan, which is very exciting! I’ll also be artist in residence at Yeovil Country Park, Water-Meadow-Wood, and finally I am thrilled to be part of the Moor Otters Project, to raise awareness and funds for Dartmoor National Park.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.
It is the in-between, the not knowing how it will turn out. My MFA tutor had a wonderful phrase for it: ‘navigating in uncertainty’. It’s something artists are surprisingly good at!

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
I have been researching rivers on Dartmoor and will be showing work in progress; Field research; photos; maps; an artist book; paintings; samples and video sketches. It will hopefully provide an interesting insight into my working process, and there will be some finished paintings too!

IMG_3759 IMG_3756

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

The 60/60 Project #52 Rai Marie

Rai Marie

Showing at Exeter Library

 IMG_3772 IMG_3776 IMG_3773

Where do you find inspiration?
Objects – I love to hoard objects as I see the beauty in normal things.

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.
Yes – full of text quotes, research, images of other artists work and prints/photos of sculptures/mark making. It’s in chronological order but sometimes I have to leave blank pages because my brain moves on before I’ve had time to experiment.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?
[Plymouth] University has had a huge impact on my work as I have learnt about new ways of thinking about and doing art.

Who are your influences?
Joseph Cornell, Duncan Cameron, Nancy Fouts

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?
I have been looking into Exeter’s Woollen industry. While researching I found a news article about how, in 2015, Tony Rowe walked sheep through Exeter. As it is his right to as freeman of the city. Wish I could have seen it!

What’s the most challenging material you’ve worked with?
I once painted latex onto the outside of 32 bananas. That bit was fine, but squeezing 32 bananas out of latex moulds is sticky and smelly work. After that I didn’t eat bananas for a month.

What’s your favourite tool?
To me the brain is the best tool.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?
I went to see BABE (Bristol Artist Book Event) for the first time this year and LOVED micro library books! They create really small books. I particularly loved Biscuit Book, in which the pages are biscuits.

Are there any comments about your work that have stayed with you?
In 2014 I created a piece that was made up of ice blocks with objects inside them, which were stacked up inside tanks. My audience was to lie between the tanks in the dark, holding a torch to “explore” the work. The tutors that marked my work said it was one of the most exciting and peaceful works they had marked.

Tell us something that you’ve learned in the last year.
I have recently become interested in Book Arts and have been learning how to make and bind my own books.

What was the last book you read? Or, what are you reading now?
The Wisdom of Psychopaths by Kevin Dutton. It brings up some interesting psychological tests and opens your mind to how not all psychopaths go one a killing spree and some psychopathic tendencies can be helpful.

Recommend an unusual place in Exeter or Devon for us to visit.
Stand in front of, or walk around the outside of, Plymouth university at 2am in light rain on a Monday night. You can hear the distant sound of people in the clubs, very few cars pass you, the darkness heightens your senses and light rain makes your skin tingle. Its beautifully eerie.

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?
My woolen book! I have learnt about Exeter’s history in the woolen industry, trade ships from the 16th century, how to wet felt, needle felt and to Japanese stab bind. My woolen book is the accumulation of knowledge and skills I have learnt and as an object feels and looks good!

IMG_3777 IMG_3778

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60

The 60/60 Project #51 Cedar Lewisohn

Cedar Lewisohn

Showing at Exeter Phonenix 

6 Cedar Lewisohn Untitled(Yellow and Red with blue figures) Hand Pressed Woodcut on paper with spray paint and ink 2013IMG_5966

Where do you find inspiration?

I find inspiration everywhere. I enjoy looking at museum collections – the show that I’m making for Exeter Phoenix is partly based on works in the RAMM collection, so that’s been a big inspiration. 

Do you keep a sketchbook? Describe it for us.

I keep multiple sketchbooks. I’m a big fan of the “Seawhite of Brighton” ones. I usually work on three or four at a time and carry them with me. I used to use A5, but more recently I’ve been using these A6 ones. Drawing is so important to my practice.

What experiences or memories have played a role in your art-making practice?

This is one for the psychotherapist’s couch! My work is quite professional, so I don’t delve into my personal history so much, it’s more about a lexicon of image making. Maybe some of my drawing and fictional writing have more personal references.

Who are your influences?

I always love looking at Bruegal and other medieval Flemish artists. But I’m also influenced by Primitive, tribal art from West Africa. Sometimes I look at contemporary art, but it’s less of an influence – I prefer looking at more historical stuff these days.

Does research play a role in your process? What is something that you have recently researched?

Research has become more relevant to my work. For the show at Exeter Phoenix I’ve been looking at the RAMM collection and talking to their curator Tony Eccles.

Was there an exhibition or a work of art you saw recently that you found intriguing?

I’m doing a lot of research into art in the Middle East at the moment for a project and I’ve been looking at lot of early film from the Gulf region. That’s really fascinating, I’ve also been looking at film posters from the 40s, 50s in the Middle East – Very beautiful things allot of them.

Have you ever made a regrettable piece of art?

Yes, they’re often the best. I remember speaking to the artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster once and they were saying – ‘If you’re not embarrassed by your art, there’s a problem with it’. If you make art that’s embarrassing then maybe it’s saying something interesting.

Describe what you enjoy about making your work.

I enjoy the whole process – from having the idea, doing the drawings, turning them into another medium to seeing them in the gallery. Making the work is the fun bit!

What are you excited about showing at Art Week Exeter?

I’m excited about the new film I’m making which is very Exeter- focused. But I’m excited about the whole show.

IMG_3766

Join in the 60/60 Project with ⌗AWExeter ⌗60artx60